Tenth Diaspora Film Festival

A feature length documentary by Ukrainian-American journalist Katya Soldak, now living in New York City, tells the story of her home country as it exits the USSR, works through two revolutions, and endures a war with Russia - all through the eyes of her family and friends in Kharkiv.

Event Venue:

SVA MFA Documentary Screening Room
136 W. 21st Street, First Floor (enter at 132 W 21st Street)
New York, NY 10011

Event Date:

Sunday, March 27, 2022 | 5-7 PM ET

Film screening followed by discussion with director Katya Soldak and editor Olga Lvoff

"The Long Breakup" by Katya Soldak

Documentary | 2020 | United States | 86 min | English, Russian, Ukrainian

Film screening followed by discussion with director Katya Soldak and editor Olga Lvoff

Kharkiv is on fire today. We do not know what is left of this city, which was once the capital of Ukraine (1919-1934) and part of the short-lived Ukrainian People's Republic (1917-1921), which was the first modern state to have a Ministry of Jewish Affairs, Yiddish as one of official languages, and to become a cradle of modern Jewish culture.  Among the Kharkiv’s landmarks there is Derzhprom (1926-1928) - the first in Europe unique constructivist complex of skyscraper towers and skyways created by young Ukrainian and Jewish architects. Did it survive?

We invite you to watch and discuss with the author of the film Katya Soldak and the film editor Olga Lvoff.

A feature length documentary by Ukrainian-American journalist Katya Soldak, of Forbes Magazine, now living in New York City, tells the story of her home country as it exits the USSR, works through two revolutions, and endures a war with Russia—all through the eyes of her family and friends in Kharkiv, a large Ukrainian city just 18 miles from the Russian border.

The Long Breakup takes viewers on an intimate journey that illustrates how big geopolitical changes affect people on a personal level, and explores what happens when democracy slips away and a nation must fight for the right to choose its future. The tale offers insight into what it’s like for an immigrant to watch her country go through crises from afar; but, most importantly, it’s a personal tale about life in the young, former Soviet country, whose struggle forms the backdrop of so many lives.

The Long Breakup was filmed over the course of a decade, and features an original soundtrack, as well as music from Ukrainian artists. The film is intended for global audiences with general interests, as well as for those interested in the USSR and post-Soviet developments.

Tickets via EventBrite

Interview with Katya Soldak

"Kontact" with Maya Pritsker on 4/1/2022

https://1drv.ms/v/s!Arr46ibHJM46mC2tL22nT98Sl_EJ?e=l7qRnG

pw: rtn

Event listing via Facebook

Film's site: https://www.thelongbreakupfilm.com/

Link to trailer: https://vimeo.com/444910146

Film's social media: 

https://www.facebook.com/thelongbreakup

https://www.instagram.com/the_long_breakup_film

Recently, while preparing a program for this film festival, I came across a very personal, narrated by the author, film about her hometown of Kharkiv. I was in this city decades ago. What I saw in the film was a different reality - a colorful modern European city with beautifully dressed smiling people - nothing to do with the squalid street crowd of the 70s. But these people were talking about the possibility of war and what they will do in case it comes. For majority of them as well as for me and any viewer the option of war was still unimaginable.

Kharkiv is on fire today. We do not know what is left of this city, which was once the capital of Ukraine (1919-1934) and part of the short-lived Ukrainian People's Republic (1917-1921), which was the first modern state to have a Ministry of Jewish Affairs, Yiddish as one of official languages, and to become a cradle of modern Jewish culture.  Among the Kharkiv’s landmarks there is Derzhprom (1926-1928) - the first in Europe unique constructivist complex of skyscraper towers and skyways created by young Ukrainian and Jewish architects. Did it survive?

Per SVA Campus Guidelines all attendees must show proof of vaccination and a photo ID to gain admittance to the SocDoc Theatre. There are no exceptions to this rule. All attendees must wear a face covering throughout the event, including during any panel or Q&A.

This project is made possible with funds from the NYSCA Electronic Media/Film in Partnership with Wave Farm: Media Arts Assistance Fund, with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, Cojeco, and Investors Foundation.